Posted by: John Ferringer | July 22, 2011

Office 365: Links Worth a Look for Friday, July 22nd, 2011


I told myself I wasn’t going to do another post this week (trying to pace myself a bit), but there’s just been too much good stuff that I’ve seen this week and I want to get these out while they’re still somewhat recent 🙂 So here’s some late Friday (in the States) reading for you!

Enjoy:

  • I like the fact that there’s still a lot of the same kinds of opportunities around customization in SharePoint Online, its just a matter of understanding how to do it in a slightly different context. Here’s an example, how to add a custom action to the Site Settings for a page in SharePoint Online: http://elczara.wordpress.com/2011/07/15/developing-sharepoint-customaction-for-sharepoint-online-in-office-365/
  • Do you have a BPOS environment and don’t want to wait for Microsoft to execute your transition into Office 365 through their processes? MigrationWiz, a tool vendor, has written up some suggested steps and actions for doing it yourself: http://migrationwiz.zendesk.com/entries/20049337-how-do-i-perform-a-bpos-to-office-365-migration
  • While at its root level I think this blog covers something pretty basic (using Word as a blog publishing tool for sites created with the SharePoint Blog site template), I think it highlights an interesting challenge with Office 365: understanding when you’re dealing with something unique to Office 365 as opposed to a feature or function that is actually inherited from one of its base platforms (SharePoint, Exchange, etc). In this case, the post is about using it to blog in Office 365, but its actually also applicable for on premise SharePoint environments: http://www.wanstor.com/blog/2011/06/28/blogging-with-office-365/
  • This resource is long, but there’s so much important stuff in here, it’s Microsoft Developer Guide for SharePoint Online in Office 365. I’m just going to call out one important aspect of this post (and may address the rest in a later post), they talk about how to go about setting up a developer environment for Office 365. I’ve been wondering about this quite a bit myself; SharePoint development requires a target environment to interact with, so it seems like you’d have to purchase some O365 licenses strictly for development to get that for this cloud scenario. But this document actually states that Microsoft recommends building out an on-premise implementation of SharePoint to match how SharePoint Online is configured and exposes functionality. Its…interesting…to see them take that approach. I understand the different challenges, pressures, and interests they have to balance out to come to that recommendation, but all the same its too bad they don’t have a better answer for this. All in all, if you’re thinking about developing for SharePoint Online, at a minimum you should check this out and think about building your VM according to their specifications: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh147180.aspx
  • Continuing with that line of thinking, Microsoft also has a Developer Toolkit for Office 365 available: http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=14889
  • There was a major revision to the Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit (MAP) released this week, v6.0, adding among other things a tool to assess client workstations for their readiness to move to Office 365: http://connect.microsoft.com/site297
  • Came across this blog this week (thank you Tweetdeck search columns!), lots of great Office 365 stuff so now its in my Google Reader list! http://seethruthecloud.com
  • From the Office 365 Community Blog we get an enthusiastic testimony for Office 365 from the perspective of an SMB owner: http://community.office365.com/en-us/b/microsoft_office_365_blog/archive/2011/07/19/best-kept-secret-for-small-businesses.aspx
  • Security is always important and Microsoft certainly hasn’t overlooked it with Office 365: http://officeonlineinthecloud.com/features/data-security/
  • Here’s a review of Office 365 by a UK blog, overall there aren’t any huge revelations in it, but they do make a good point about some of the upgrades and updates that businesses may have to make to be able to get the full experience from the service: http://www.gadgetstech.co.uk/2011/07/review-microsoft-office-365/
  • Sorry for a second post to this blog in the same post, but if you’re wanting to assess your organization’s total cost of ownership for Office 365, this may be worth the time (although you will have to give up your contact info, so you may also get a call or two; no such thing as a free lunch!): http://officeonlineinthecloud.com/free-tools/

That’s what I’ve been reading in the last few days or so, hope they’re helpful!

John

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Responses

  1. […] few LWL posts ago I linked to a manual migration solution proposed by a vendor called MigrationWiz that BPOS […]


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